TESTIMONIALS

From Our Parents & Alumni

We have 2 kids studying at the Niagara Academy of Tennis. We visited several schools in Canada and abroad and found the Niagara Academy of Tennis best suited for our children. The children are very happy at school and receive exceptional education and tennis training. Due to the smaller class sizes, each student gets individual attention. The teachers are very committed and help the students in every way.

My son went to the Canada-wide Science fair in 2017 and received a lot of guidance from his teachers. The students are surrounded by peers who excel at school and tennis with good placement in well known universities.

The curriculum is well balanced with tennis and education. It is the only school in Canada which is focused on excellent tennis training and providing world class education in the same campus.

— From Doctors Sivakumar Annamalai and Saraswati Sivakumar,
August, 2017

I would like to thank you and all Niagara Academy teachers to assist Dylan in completion of his study. The academy you have built, the culture, knowledge and flexibility of teachers and coaches is very unique worldwide. Niagara Academy allows young athletes to grow their game and education. Once again big thanks from bottom of my heart.

Graduating from Niagara Academy, Dylan is well equipped as a student and athlete and without any doubt will do well in school and on tennis court while attending Nebraska University. It is our expectation that together we will be able to celebrate many of his future achievements.  As you know Daniel has graduated from Indiana University with very good marks, played leader role for his team, contributing to team overall success and made significant accomplishments along the way including finishing as 6th winningest double player in University history (founded January 20, 1820). Daniel has also won three consecutive BIG10 sportsmanship award. Recently Daniel has been accepted into MBA program at Division I school as graduate assistant coach for men’s and women team. It is great accomplishment not only for Daniel but also great achievement for all people who helped him along the way. Niagara Academy, coaches, teachers and your own involvement in his life played significant role in his success . Many thanks to all of you.

— From Doroto and Marian Bednarczyk, parents of Dylan Bednarczyk
(2016 Niagara Academy graduate)

After graduating from NAT in 2009, I enrolled in McMaster University, where I completed my Bachelors degree in Human Geography and Urban Planning in 2013. From there, I completed a Masters in the same field at the University of Toronto, and as of September 2014, I am working towards my PhD. My research looks at the intersections of housing, finance, and immigration policy, as they relate to questions of social justice. I am particularly interested in how we can reform the way (current) markets work to ensure quality housing for all, and especially for racialized and low-income immigrants. The independent thinking, time management, and perseverance I developed as a student-athlete at Niagara Academy has directly impacted my performance in academics. Without question, Niagara Academy was the single most important and foundational time in my life, and the kindness and quality of character you will find there — among coaches, teachers, and friends — is second to none.

— Dylan Simone, University of Toronto PhD Candidate

After high school, I received a full scholarship to the University of Detroit Mercy where I competed on a Division 1 tennis team. At Detroit I earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology, in addition to a minor in business administration. Upon graduating from college in May of 2014, I moved to Cambridge, MA to coach tennis at the Tennis Academy at Harvard for four months. I am currently employed by a firm named Fidelity Investments in Toronto. In terms of my future plans, I am hoping to remain with Fidelity Investments for a long and prosperous career. On the personal side, I would love to backpack through Europe this summer!

— From Raina Halabi, Niagara Academy 2009 Grad

It has been an amazing year here at Georgia Southern, although it has been challenging in the tennis part. In the season I have been playing in doubles as number one and two, and in singles from four to six. The tennis and/or every other sport atmosphere is crazy, everyone gets super intense when playing against another school. There is a big loyalty and a great support from the fans.

The facilities are great, we have a football stadium with around 20,000 seats, the basketball arena with 7,000, and softball and baseball around 4,000. We also have our own lockers with showers for the tennis team.

Now I know why so many people in Canada would get shocked or impressed when I would tell them that I would go to the south for studying, people here are so different from what I’m used to. It’s all a different culture. People here is all about fishing, hunting, camouflage clothing, big trucks and BBQ.

I’m really happy to be here, and for sure I have done the right decision to come here. I would be more than welcome to help students from NAT to come here and share my experience with them. I already talked to Alexis and Johny to motivate them to come here hahah, I’m missing Luke to tell him!

I can now say that I’m living my dream! Thank you for helping me reach it!

— From Jose Eduardo Landin at Georgia Southern University

Alumnus, Hans Hach, has been visiting Niagara Academy while here competing in Futures tournaments in Ontario. Hans described life on the tennis pro circuit to the students.

The goal of competitive tennis players at the high school level is just to play as much tennis as possible and win as many tournaments as possible. At the college level, balancing academics with tennis becomes the main goal, especially with tournaments almost every weekend. Being on a tennis team means players needs to give their best all the time, so they don’t let the team down. At the same time, they need to keep up with their studies to maintain their place at the college. Once they hit the professional ranks, there is a whole new set of conditions to challenge players.

Playing professional tennis looks glamorous, but sometimes it can be lonely. Players are no longer part of a team and they need to be away from family and friends, as they travel to practice or for tournaments. Whereas being part of a team at college level gives players a very active social life, traveling as an individual on the pro circuit means spending a lot of time on one’s own.

It’s extremely important to stay healthy, both physically and mentally. That means balancing fitness, tennis and downtime. Playing at increasingly higher levels of play also means players will lose a lot of games, some they think they should win. Learning to deal with the losses requires a mental toughness players can’t survive without.

Whereas the top players have the finances to fly around in their own jets and have health and coaching professionals available whenever they need them, players in the lower ranks always have to find the most economical way of getting what they need. To get one thing, they may have to give up another, all the while trying to make sure they have what is necessary to continue to develop as a competitive player. Some very talented players don’t make it to the top because they can’t afford it.

Despite all these downsides, young professional players continue to make sacrifices because they want the challenge and tennis is what they love.

— Hans Hach, Niagara Academy Alumnus, ATP Tennis Professional

Alumnus, Hans Hach, has been visiting Niagara Academy while here competing in Futures tournaments in Ontario. Hans described life on the tennis pro circuit to the students.

The goal of competitive tennis players at the high school level is just to play as much tennis as possible and win as many tournaments as possible. At the college level, balancing academics with tennis becomes the main goal, especially with tournaments almost every weekend. Being on a tennis team means players needs to give their best all the time, so they don’t let the team down. At the same time, they need to keep up with their studies to maintain their place at the college. Once they hit the professional ranks, there is a whole new set of conditions to challenge players.

Playing professional tennis looks glamorous, but sometimes it can be lonely. Players are no longer part of a team and they need to be away from family and friends, as they travel to practice or for tournaments. Whereas being part of a team at college level gives players a very active social life, traveling as an individual on the pro circuit means spending a lot of time on one’s own.

It’s extremely important to stay healthy, both physically and mentally. That means balancing fitness, tennis and downtime. Playing at increasingly higher levels of play also means players will lose a lot of games, some they think they should win. Learning to deal with the losses requires a mental toughness players can’t survive without.

Whereas the top players have the finances to fly around in their own jets and have health and coaching professionals available whenever they need them, players in the lower ranks always have to find the most economical way of getting what they need. To get one thing, they may have to give up another, all the while trying to make sure they have what is necessary to continue to develop as a competitive player. Some very talented players don’t make it to the top because they can’t afford it.

Despite all these downsides, young professional players continue to make sacrifices because they want the challenge and tennis is what they love.

— Hans Hach, Niagara Academy Alumnus, ATP Tennis Professional

This is what some of our students have to say…When I arrived to Canada I didn’t know English but this time my English is improving because I am taking a lot of English classes.

— Severo, Grade 7 (Mexico)

I like this school because it offers an international culture, something that other schools can’t offer. I also like that this school isn’t too big compared to others. This school has fewer kids than one classroomin another school. The advantage of that is that you get to know the people better and you get more attention from teachers during a class. I came to this school because I wanted to improve my tennisgame and I also wanted a change from a large noisy classroom where teachers don’t pay attention toyou. Now that I have come I know I made the right choice because my game has improved and theteachers are a lot better than the other schools I’ve been to. This is my fifth school in my life but it is byfar my favourite.

— Charles, Grade 8 (ON, Canada)

I went to the Academy and the staff and students were very friendly with me. This has been a different experience compared to my life in Venezuela. I chose this Academy because I want to learn English and to train in tennis to become stronger and to play better.

— Miguel, Grade 12 (Venezuela)

I came to the academy because I wanted to improve my tennis game. I knew the only way I would be doing that is if I came to the academy. I like that the academy is an international school. You get to learn about different cultures from around the world. Also I like that the class sizes are small. It means more time and attention for each kid at school and on court.

— Mia, Grade 7 (ON, Canada)

I went to the Niagara Academy of tennis for two weeks for summer camp last year. It was fantastic and I decided that I wanted to visit the academy again. On my second visit to the Academy I stayed at the academy for four months, for the second semester. My home stay family was very nice. We went on a few excursions on weekends, to Niagara on the Lake and to Niagara Falls, when my Mexican sister and Ididn’t have any tournaments planned for the weekends. I met students from Mexico, Germany, Canada,and so on and had a great time with them. The school was very nice, as I was in small classes. I was in regular classes at the school and I also had my individual tutoring lessons in French, Math and Spanish, which helped me to do my homework from Switzerland. The school schedule was very good, and the school times were the same every day. The tennis training was very intense. I had three hours of training a day and one hour of fitness. After a few days I made improvements on my technique and footwork. This helped me to get into the finals of tournaments. The coaches signed me up in tournaments and watched us playing matches. After a match we did an analysis on what went well and what I still had to work on. The fitness training was very exhausting; we did many exercises using weights and a lot of endurance training. I have had an unforgettable time at the academy and would love to come back again.

— Lydia, Grade 10 (Switzerland)

When I came to Canada it was a very different experience from where I lived in Mexico. I’m getting toknow Canadian culture and learning a new language. My parents decided to send me to Niagara Academy for a better life. First my brother went to Canada and then me.

— Cuau, Grade 7 (Mexico)

When I arrived to Canada I did not know any English but in a few months I understood and I’m still in theprocess of improving it. My home stay family is very good and they treat me like a member of their family. The workouts are very good and I have greatly improved my tennis. The Academy makes me feel comfortable and it is very good.

— Donato, Grade 12 (Venezuela)

I wanted to go to another country to improve my English communication skills but also wanted to play tennis. My goal was to collect experiences, to improve my English and my level in tennis. Some people told me I was crazy because I would get homesick, but fortunately I didn’t listen to them because rightnow I am having the best time of my life. I miss my family and friends but here in Canada I have a really nice family and good friends. I have met many people from different countries and learned their cultures. I now have friends from Canada, Mexico, Russia, Venezuela and Switzerland. I also had the opportunity to visit Mexico with one of my friends over Christmas break and it was an amazing and unforgettable adventure for me. To go to Niagara Academy is a lot of fun but also hard work and there are different parts which make it special. I could never survive one of the fitness classes alone but because of the motivation my friends give me we can all do it together. For me the academy feels like a big family and I think we are a really good team.

— Greta, Grade 11 (Germany)

Before coming to this school I played tennis once a week at a junior program and had some private lessons with my coach. I came to Niagara Academy with the intention of getting a better education, more tennis and to feel like I belong. That is exactly what I got. My grades started improving, my tennis went to a whole new level and every morning I woke up with a smile on my face, excited to go to school. Throughout the five years I have been here I have seen many people come and go from countries around the world. Every time a new student comes you get to learn more about other cultures, their traditions, food and more. It truly is amazing. I have also been able to share my Ukrainian background with them. You get to know them well and we become like a family. When you become family it is hard to lose them when they have to go home, but they stay with us through memories. I am very happy tobe able to come here. I’ve improved so much and I feel like I belong somewhere. I am proud to be a NAT student.

— Dominika, Grade 8 (ON, Canada)

And a few of our young summer campers say…I like the academy and my home stay family. I really like all the city. This is a good experience.

— Fernando, age 12 (Mexico)

My summer was very good and fun. Why is the summer ending! Niagara Academy is the best in the world.

— Maxim, age 12 (Russia)

I like the waterfalls of Niagara, the Academy and the teachers in the Academy. I also like Canada’s Wonderland and the mall.

— Adam, age 11 (Mexico)

I was here for 2 months. I liked the soccer and the swimming pool.

— Andrei, age 11 (Russia)

 I live in Canada for 3 weeks. I like tennis and fitness. I like English, too.

— Nikita, age 12 (Russia)

CONTACT US

Niagara Academy of Tennis
3373 First Avenue
Vineland, Ontario L0R 2E0
905.562.0683
info@niagaraacademy.ca